Louie Gohmert: The FBI Refusing to See Evidence in Democrat IT Scandal

Louie Gohmert: The FBI Refusing to See Evidence in Democrat IT Scandal.

by Debra Heine · June 6, 2018

President Trump turned his attention to the Democrat IT scandal on Twitter this morning, calling it “a key to much of the corruption we see today.”

Our Justice Department must not let Awan & Debbie Wasserman Schultz off the hook. The Democrat I.T. scandal is a key to much of the corruption we see today. They want to make a “plea deal” to hide what is on their Server. Where is Server? Really bad!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 7, 2018
The president is getting frustrated because after an investigation that has dragged on for over a year, prosecutors have thus far failed to bring a myriad of charges against former Pakistani IT employees who worked for between 40 and 50 Democratic members of Congress.

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) alleged on the House floor on Tuesday that the FBI has actually instructed witnesses to not bring documentary evidence to them about the Awan brothers’ case so they can say there’s no evidence for them to investigate.

Imran Awan and his family were barred from the House computer network on February 2, 2017, days after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, and months after the House’s Office of Inspector General warned that members of the clan had “unauthorized access” to data during the 2016 election.

A House employee told The Daily Caller’s Luke Rosiak that former DNC head Debbie Wasserman Schultz became “frantic, not normal,” “making the rounds” to House officials in an effort to kill the investigation.

Wasserman Schultz cornered House Chief Administrative Officer Phil Kiko and called him a “f*cking Islamophobe,” saying “you will not so much as take away their parking spots,” the two House employees said Kiko told them.
The OIG alleged in a September 30, 2016, presentation that “Imran Awan and his family members were logging into the servers of members who had previously fired him, funneling data off the network.” The report further alleged that steps were “being taken to conceal their activity.”

The House inspector general, a distinguished cybersecurity expert, was taken off the case, and it was given to the Capitol Police instead. Months later, police banned the Awan group from the network. The Committee on House Administration put out a statement saying “House Officials became aware of suspicious activity and alleged theft committed by certain House IT support staff.” Since then, no official body has ever publicly provided any information about the case. But the IG report, obtained by TheDCNF, shows that theft was not the primary issue being warned about.
Capitol Police have not made any arrests, “despite numerous red flags,” Rosiak reported. However, they did “inadvertently” give evidence to defense attorneys that was supposed to go to prosecutors.

“Unfortunately, the only thing they’ve indicted Mr. Awan for… is for basically making a false statement to get a loan,” Gohmert complained in his speech on the House floor Tuesday. “But there are dozens and dozens of felonies in which he’s implicated from his work here on Capitol Hill.”

One of the allegations against Imran Awan is that he fraudulently purchased items like iPhones, iPads, etc. — ostensibly for Congress — as gifts or bribes to cronies in Pakistan, including Pakistani intelligence agents and police.

“There were clearly dozens of fraudulent purchase orders,” Gohmert claimed.

He added, “The FBI has had opportunities to have those invoices presented to them, and each time they have instructed, ‘don’t bring any of those documents — we don’t want to see any of that — we just want to talk to you.’”

The congressman claimed that the FBI as recently as this week continues to report that they’ve found no evidence of anything other than a false statement on a loan.

“Why? Because they’ve instructed — ‘we don’t want to see the documents that prove those cases.’ They’re readily available for anybody — any federal office who wants to see ‘em. But they don’t want to see ‘em,” Gohmert lamented. “So they can keep reporting to the new U.S. attorney that there’s no evidence — no evidence. Nah — there’s just nothing there. They can tell the attorney general, ‘yeah, we’ve looked into it, there’s nothing there.’”

Gohmert also noted that according to Luke Rosiak’s reporting, between 70 and 80 percent of the witnesses who have information about the Awan brothers’ crimes have never been interviewed by the FBI.

According to Rosiak, “the Caucus server — identified as prime evidence in the cybersecurity case — physically disappeared” shortly after the IG report came out in September 2016.

“The FBI has no interest whatsoever — at least so far” in investigating what happened to the server on which Awan put data about 40+ members of Congress, Gohmert said. “This is really tragic.”

“Taxpayers are paying for Imran Awan’s lawyer ’cause he says he’s destitute, yet he sent $100,000 or more over to Pakistan in one transaction and we know that he has property listed in his bankruptcy! We know that he was in business and took a loan from a guy in Pakistan who has known ties to Hezbollah. And they owed him money,” he said.

“And we can’t get the FBI interested in that. There are too many holdovers apparently from Mueller’s day and Comey’s day. We need to know what was compromised. And I don’t care who the person works for, congressional computers should not be serviced from Pakistan.”

Gohmert also said he understands the reluctance of Republican members of Congress to stand up to the FBI.

“Last guy [we] saw making charges, talking about FBI’s lack of duty… he ended up being defeated by the FBI raid on his office — his daughter’s office — two weeks before the election,” he said. Gohmert was referring to the raid on former Rep. Curt Weldon’s daughter and her close friend in October 2006 as part of an investigation into improper lobbying and consulting contracts. Weldon was never charged in the incident and, according to USA Today, the incident cost him his re-election.

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